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Building a Barndominium?

By LandHub.com

In a previous article, we wrote about what a barndominium is and why many landowners opt for this different type of housing option. It’s easy to get distracted by all of the newness and exciting aspects of constructing a barndo, but as with any building project, there are many things to keep in mind before getting started.

If you’re not quite sure if a barndominium is the right fit for your property or if you’re still weighing options, here are all of the things you should know before making any moves.

Things to keep in mind before building a barndominium

With the rise of the farmhouse aesthetic and shows like Fixer Upper, Home Town, and other HGTV favorites, many people have been trying their hand at DIY remodels and/or builds. Barndos are a special type of building and require just as much planning, if not more, like any other project.

Here are the top things to be aware of before embarking on your barndo journey.

Check the paint:

If you are going to be renovating an existing barn, it is essential that you inspect the previous paint job. That’s because many barns use exterior paint on the inside, and the coatings of these paints can be dangerous for a living space.

Prepare for hidden costs:

Yes, barndos are less expensive and quicker to construct than a traditional home, but if you will be living in your barndominium, it will still need certain features. Things like plumbing, an HVAC system, siding, permits, etc., often sneak up.

Hire licensed professionals:

It may seem like a barndo is a project that you could take on yourself, but there are so many crucial elements that require expert intervention. For example, barndominiums often need complex electrical work as it is a non-living space being converted. Another element many might not consider to be crucial is having the right windows and doors. In order to make the space as comfortable as possible, you will want to invest in the best options.

Check the permits and laws in your area:

Every place has its own rules, but any building project or remodel will require a permit to ensure everything is up to code. Realtor.com suggests anticipating anywhere from $400 to $2,000 for permit costs. In addition to these permits, most barns are required to have a sprinkler system installed, so be sure to factor this into your budget and planning timeline.

Consider losing certain creature comforts:

Barndominiums can certainly be beautiful, functional, and an incredible space to live in, but if you spend more time browsing decoration ideas on Pinterest than looking at what a barndo lifestyle looks like, you may be shocked. Barndominiums are typically one-story units, they can feel louder than a traditional home and are generally for more rural settings. If you are okay with all of these characteristics, then move forward with the barndominium process!

A barndominium can be an excellent living option for someone with some rural land or even an existing barn that can be remodeled. However, don’t jump into this project blindly because even if it may not seem as big as a traditional home build, there are many factors to consider. If you’re ready to start planning out your barndominium, check out Land Hub’s current land listings to find the right space for your project!